Forum Comments

Mourlhon-Dallies: The COVID 19 pandemic on display: multiple temporalities in confined Paris
In Welcome to the Forum
Karlsson: Interactional dots
In Welcome to the Forum
Susanna Karlsson
Jun 17, 2021
Thank you Eldin, I'm so glad you enjoyed it! I'd be very interested in reading your work on the hermeneutic circle, if there's anything published? I imagine that a lot of our movement in space is more guided than we like to think. There's a whole field of applied psychology that deals with how to make customers end up in especially attractive sections of a store. In this case, from what I've observed (I don't see how I could get access to naturalistic video data AND stay within ethical boundaries), the dots in the shopping area may do things to us psychologically, ie I can't observe any obvious orientation to the dots, but in the queue section, there is an apparent orientation to the existence of spots, and introduction of new behaviour. People tend to stand on the spots. If there are very few people, there is often a free spot between people lining up, allowing additional distancing. At the beginning of the pandemic, a colleague told me about a thing that happened to her when standing in line. She chose to not stand on the dot, but a little behind it, to create more space than required by the covid restrictions, as an extra courtesy to the person in front of her. Then another person cut in line in front of her and placed themselves on the dot. She confronted them, and they let her know that since she didn't stand on the dot, she was obviously not standing in line. Sure, it's anecdotal, but it was actually what led me to take a CA approach to the dots. To me, this was participants orienting to the dots, and the person cutting the queue acted in overlap, identifying a form of possible transition relevance place, taking the chance to take over the turn.
1
Barni & Paris: Redesigning museum space in times of pandemic: an opportunity for cultural participation?
In Welcome to the Forum
Karlsson: Interactional dots
In Welcome to the Forum
Susanna Karlsson
Jun 15, 2021
Thank you for your question! Yes, there are some. One is this, from the floor of a Gothenburg tram. The two top lines are more or less the same message in Swedish and in English: 'keep your distance'. Below, much smaller, is one line in Swedish, thanking the reader for complying with the request (≈'thank you for your concern'). Below that, in English, we have a line saying 'travel safely', which I guess you could say sends the reader off on their further travels. Interestingly, it's like the composition of the sign makes up one end of a conversation on its own, constructing a cooperative reader. Then there is also this one: In this picture, it's placed on a door. But it's also used on the floor. This sign is fully parallel. It should be noted that the English isn't exactly standard ('keep distance' needs a 'your'), but is a verbatim translation of the Swedish. I've been looking for bilingual signs with other languages than Swedish+English. I would have expected some signs featuring the larger immigrant languages, for examples. In the areas where I've been collecting, I've found none. I assume that if I were to collect in more diverse areas of Gothenburg, the collection would encompass more languages, and also a larger variation in the floor signs' materiality. I've noticed that some chains, like very large supermarket chains, tend to have multilingual posters at the entrance, featuring at the very least Swedish, English and Arabic. But the 'floor dots' seem to be restricted to Swedish and sometimes English. One thing that contributes to the lack of variety could be that the shape and placement themselves are a strong enough reminder to most people. Maybe the verbal instructions aren't actually necessary (anymore)?
Content media
0
0
 

Susanna Karlsson

More actions